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SKYWARN

In most years, thunderstorms, tornadoes and lightning cause hundreds of injuries and deaths and billions in property and crop damages. To obtain critical weather information, the National Weather Service (NWS) established SKYWARN® with partner organizations. SKYWARN® is a volunteer program with between 350,000 and 400,000 trained severe weather spotters. These volunteers help keep their local communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service. Are you interested in getting certified? Its FREE!

www.weather.gov/SKYWARN


Did you know that the US Department of Commerce has Hurricane Hunter Aircraft?

Hurricanes are a huge disrupter to the US Economy...Learn More 

Devastation of a Category 5 Hurricane

Dangerous Lightning Strikes caught on Camera!

  Driving into A Storm!

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Join us live as we Track Storms during Florida's 2022 Hurricane Season 

Our job is rebuilding your roof. We work with your insurance company to provide a guaranteed roofing system built to last.

Our Storm Team is ready whenever and wherever severe weather strikes. You can follow our adventures through some of the most severe weather mother nature offers as you ride along with the American Hero Construction of Florida Storm Team. My name is Steven and I will be your host. 

Our videos will be updated as often as weather dictates.  If you can safely capture storm images, we may feature you on this website.  email  [email protected]

Guide To Hurricane Terms


Tropical Wave

An inverted trough (an elongated area of relatively low pressure) or cyclonic curvature maximum moving east to west across the tropics. These can lead to the formation of a tropical cyclone. Also known as an easterly wave.

Tropical Disturbance

A tropical weather system with organized convection (generally 100-300 miles in diameter) originating in the tropics or subtropics, having a non-frontal migratory character and maintaining its identity for 24 hours or longer. It may or may not be associated with a detectable perturbation of the wind field.

Tropical Depression

A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed is 38 MPH (33 knots) or less. Sustained winds are defined as one-minute average wind measured at about 33 ft (10 meters) above the surface.

Tropical Storm

A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed is between 39 -73 MPH (34-63 knots).

Hurricane

An intense tropical cyclone with maximum sustained surface wind speeds of 74 MPH (64 knots) or higher. The term hurricane is used for Northern Hemisphere tropical cyclones east of the International Dateline to the Greenwich Meridian. The term typhoon is used for Pacific tropical cyclones north of the Equator west of the International Dateline.

Eye Wall

An organized band of cumulonimbus clouds immediately surrounding the center of the tropical cyclone.

Landfall

The intersection of the surface center of a tropical cyclone with a coastline. Because the strongest winds in a tropical cyclone are not located precisely at the center, it is possible for a cyclone’s strongest winds to be experienced over land even if landfall does not occur. Similarly, it is possible for a tropical cyclone to make landfall and have its strongest winds remain over the water.

Tropical Cyclone

A low pressure system (not associated with a front) that develops over tropical and sometimes sub-tropical waters and has organized deep convection with a closed wind circulation about a well-defined center.

Extratropical Cyclone

A cyclone (of any intensity) for which the primary energy source is baroclinic (i.e., results from the temperature contrast between warm & cold air masses).

Post-Tropical Cyclone

A cyclone that no longer possesses sufficient tropical characteristics to be considered a tropical cyclone. Post-tropical cyclones can continue to carry heavy rains and high winds. Note: former tropical cyclones that become extratropical and remnant lows are 2 specific classes of post-tropical cyclones.

Remnant Low

A class of post-tropical cyclone that no longer possesses the convective organization required of a tropical cyclone and has maximum sustained winds of less than 34 knots.

Storm Surge

An abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane or other intense storm, and whose height is the difference between the observed level of the sea surface and the level that would have occurred in the absence of the cyclone. Storm surge is usually estimated by subtracting the normal or astronomic high tide from the observed storm tide.

Storm Tide

The actual level of sea water resulting from the astronomic tide combined with the storm surge.

Tropical Storm Watch

An announcement that sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph are possible within the specified area within 48 hours in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.

Tropical Storm Warning

An announcement that sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph are expected somewhere within the specified area within 36 hours in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.

Hurricane Watch

An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are possible within the specified area in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds.

Hurricane Warning

An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are expected somewhere within the specified area in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds. The warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.

Short Term Watches and Warnings

These warnings provide detailed information about specific hurricane threats, such as flash floods and tornadoes.

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